Sitting

Let’s talk about sitting!

Sitting is often one of the big milestones that many parents look forward to – that and walking of course, but we will save that for another day!

Children often are excited to sit as well, as it opens up a new world for them to watch and interact with.

What does it take to sit?

Just like with rolling, in order to sit there are some fundamental skills a child needs to be able to do to sit independently.

Sitting requires control of flexion (bending) and extension (straightening) movement patterns, which start to develop during rolling.  Sitting also requires automatic postural reactions, which are made up of righting reactions (keeping head on body), protective reactions (putting our hands out if we are falling) and equilibrium reactions (balance).  These reactions also start to be developed during rolling and continue to progress with sitting.

So you can see why it’s important for children to achieve milestones in the right order, as they help develop skills that they need to complete the next one!

How sitting develops

Sitting is one of the only milestones that a child typically learns before they are able to get in and out of that position.  Parents typically put a child into sitting position and the child starts in what is called Tripod sitting – this is when a childs legs are out, often in a “V” position or a ring position, with their hands planted on the ground between their legs.  Once the child gains better control, they will start to come into a more upright position with the back in a c-shape and the child will start taking their hands off the ground to play briefly.

The child will then work on shifting directions and their body weight in the c-sit to gain more balance and control.  C-sitting should then continue to improve to nice upright sitting, with the child able to reach in front of themselves for toys, rotate to look the sides and reach up for higher toys.

When should my child be sitting?

Children can typically begin to tripod sit (within a parents legs) around 4 months of age.  C-sitting for brief periods (with lots of tipping over!) should start to develop just after 5 months.

I recommend parents stay close by, but allow their child to tip in order to help children develop those important reactions mentioned above.

You may also try propping pillows just beside and behind them (or use a breastfeeding pillow) so that you can be in front of your child to play and engage.

By 6 months, children should be starting to sit independently (working towards that tall sitting) with only the occasional loss of balance.  This typically coincides with introducing solids, as a child should be able to maintain good sitting posture in a high chair to ensure safe eating.

If your child is not showing the building blocks of sitting by 6 months, call your local pediatric physiotherapist for a consult.  As always, if you are in Kitchener-Waterloo or Perth County, give me a shout!

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