Rolling

A typical question for most physiotherapists who see children (and honestly one I think most moms ask themselves at one point or another) is ‘should my child be doing X by now?’  So, I thought I would take a few blog posts and write a little about each of the big gross motor milestones.

Let’s start with rolling, the same thing most kiddos will start with.  I know for my husband, that was when ours stopped being “a loaf of bread” and became a tiny human to him – suddenly they can move!

What does it take to roll?

Rolling can seem simple to us as adults but in reality is quite complex.  There are a LOT of components to rolling.  A child needs neck control, shoulder mobility and control, the beginning of core stability and, finally, hip and knee control.  Without all of these components, the child may not be able to initiate the movement, or they won’t be able to control the momentum.

To start learning all of those fundamental building blocks (especially the neck control and shoulder mobility/control), it takes practice, and that means TUMMY TIME!  Tummy time is so vital – more on this another day!

The start of rolling

The first part of rolling that parents typically see is when their child is on their back and they are able to roll to their side.  This usually starts to emerge around 2-3 months.  This either happens because they are looking at something to the side and up from them or because they put their feet in the air and they tipped over.

Then it progresses to a purposeful head movement and the body follows the head. When this starts, the body is quite stiff and tends to roll like a log, and the roll can be a bit uncontrolled sometimes, startling a baby.  But, as those fundamental skills improve with practice, we see rolling with rotation and bending through the trunk.

To roll from tummy to back, babies need to bring one knee up toward their chest and lift their pelvis slightly to start the roll.

When should my child roll?

Some children start rolling as early as 4 months, but a typically developing child should roll both directions by 6 months.

If your child is not showing the building blocks to rolling by 4 months or isn’t rolling by 6 months call your local pediatric physiotherapist!  As always, if you are in Kitchener-Waterloo or Perth County, give me a shout!

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